Rock, Prog-Rock, Metal

Exclusive interview by Vsevolod Baronin with Royal Hunt leader, André Andersen Taken on 12/10/2020, Moscow, Russia. Originally published in Russian. There is a serious suspicion that Dystopia — Part I, the fifteenth studio album by Royal Hunt, an international act from Copenhagen, released in December 2020, went relatively unnoticed, not only because of the newfangled contempt of listeners for the physical media (records and CD’s), but mainly due to socio-economic perturbations around the fancy coronavirus pandemic. And it was very, very vain: it was on this album that the leader of the band André Andersen, a Russian-born multi-instrumentalist and composer, embodied the plans hatched back in 1999 — to create and record a full-fledged opera project featured several vocalists. And on a more serious basis: the source of inspiration and, let's say, the libretto for Dystopia — Part I was the first half of a very popular and respected book by the classic of American “new wave” science fiction Ray Bradbury (1920–2012) — this time it is Fahrenheit 451. As the name of the album implies, in the future, we should meet with the second part of Dystopia, but for now, it is worth discussing with the ideologist of the…
Interview by Vsevolod Baronin. Taken on 10/25/2008, Moscow, Russia. Originally published in Russian. What is eccentricity for a world-class rock musician? Play 20 notes per second? To patent a seven-string electric guitar? To record a live album with an unheard-of and unimaginable creative concept? Or, finally, go on tour with master classes in Russia, not excluding cities like Ryazan that are quite unique for a musician of such level? Well, since Steve Vai, who does not need the introduction as the electric guitar maestro, did all of the above, we can award him the title of rock eccentric #1. Surprisingly, when communicating in person, Steve turned out to be not at all the character that his music and stage shows represent, but a very polite interlocutor who answers even the trickiest questions in great detail. Steve's answers, of course, sometimes radiate hints of the aforementioned eccentricity and that's why they are good: they allow you to look at familiar concepts from a completely unexpected side, which, perhaps, would never have occurred to a person who is not a rock guitarist of a truly galactic level.